Monday Classroom: Y’allses, we’s gonna clean up our languageamation, right? riiighht!

Morning, all y’allses! What? You think all y’allses isn’t correct? Well, it ain’t. It ain’t even correct in many southern towns. Nope. But it’s correct in my pea-head, so there y’allses goes’ses :-D

Our manuscripts/work/language will never be perfect. Yeah, I know! It’s difficult to imagine, isn’t it? That we aren’t or will never be perfect? Nor will our books/essays/short stories/letters/posts, etc. Lawd and Dang. However, we can strengthen our work by at least knowing The Rules and applying them when we “should;” and then we can also break the rules with a firm and knowledgeable hand instead of feeling flabbergastivated by them. Right? Riighhht!

Do you own a Strunk & White? No? *Gasp!* Go ye and purchase one. I’ll wait whilst you do. *Jeopardy music here* You back? All right then (and notice, all right is two words—two!) let’s begin.

As I wrote above, all right should be two words. Not alright.

Do you feel badly? Well, what’s wrong with your hands? Oh dear! Folkses, it is: I feel bad.

Most always when we write “hopefully” we mean “I hope.” Or at least we should mean I hope. I hope y’allses will use I hope instead of hopefully, which means in a hopeful manner.

I often see “that” used instead of “who—” if you are writing/speaking of a person, then it is who. She is a woman who likes strawberries right off the vine; not, she is a woman that likes strawberries right off the vine.

Commas before which’s. The dog wanted his walk, which was most inconvenient for the woman who wasn’t yet ready.

We Southern/Mountain folk often add words and such all and all that stuff and a little bit of this and that the t’other. I often use colloquialism in my work, since my settings are usually in the Appalachian/Deep South. However, I am careful I do not over-do it, and as well, I use a firm hand by Knowing the Rules so I can break them when I want to.

Off of is incorrect, and plain old “off” is correct. The woman jumped off of the couch and ran to the porch to yell, “Git off’n my land!” should be: The woman jumped off the couch and ran to the porch to yell “Git off’n my land!”

As well, instead of “Could of” we should write/say “could have” – I could of had a V8 is incorrect! Don’t you watch commercials anymore to learn yer grammarfications? It’s I could have had a V8! I gots my verbs, yeah, and they’ses makes my sentence so nice and loverly!

We don’t have to merge together! We can simply merge! Who knew?

Let’s all go to the grammar store! wheee!

Nauseous versus Nauseated. If you feel it, it is nauseated. I am nauseated becauses I ain’t et my breakfas yet, y’allses. What? That sentence? What about it?

And this one I see misused over and over and over and over. More importantly and most importantly is incorrect. Sorry, it is! Is, too! Yes it is too incorrect. Humph! It should be more or most important. So, go ye and speak importantly no more!

Y’allses gots any grammerfications and other writin bloooperdoops you wanna tawlk about? :-D

Now, go do the day!

And P.S. – Thank you all for your support for Tender Graces Promo on Thursday & Friday to launch Family Graces, and for Mom’s day. Appreciate you all!

And a head’s up that Rose & Thorn Journal’s spring issue will go live the 15th –  that’s tomorrow! Hope you will stop by to peruse the prose, poetry, and art. We appreciate you.

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16 thoughts on “Monday Classroom: Y’allses, we’s gonna clean up our languageamation, right? riiighht!

  1. Nauseous/nauseated has been a pet peeve of mine forever. And now, guess what? Dictionary.com and Mirriam-Webster.com have both caved. “2: affected with nausea or disgust”. Sigh.
    My biggest cringe is impacted/have an impact on. If I have impacted you, I have blammed into you or somehow managed to plug you up so you can’t poop. If I have had an impact on you, I have influenced you. Oh wait! No. *You* have had a most wonderful impact on me!

  2. Alright, already! You’re making me feel badly, Kat. I am the sort of writer that has no need for manuels and such. So get off of your pedestal before I get nauseated.

    Hopefully you know I’m kidding. Love the reminders.

  3. Oh gosh, it has been so long since I was in English or a writing class I have forgotten some of this. Of course, I have you to PLEASE help me and our oldest that teaches ESL and is one of my biggest critique people.

  4. Kat,
    This mental telepathy thing we’ve got is getting downright scary. First we thought of the same title for our book. Then as I was getting ready to write my next blog post, The Elements of Style: A Timeless Classic, I read your Monday Classroom post. I had planned to focus on Chapter II, Principles of Composition. Oh well. I guess I will put that one on the shelf for awhile.

    I did enjoy this post. You can never go wrong quoting The Elements of Style. Thanks, Kat.

  5. Hi Kat – lots there .. I questioned the all right alright scenario recently – so good to have it endorsed again …

    So often we’re dashing through commenting or writing and the world turns upside down and a complete dog’s dinner comes out .. I have to say I get frustrated – shouldn’t though .. because I do it myself ..

    Cherry bye for now!! Love these reminders re our lingo .. Hilary

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